Ask Pete: What Is An RO System?

Today’s “Ask Pete” is all about Reverse Osmosis Systems. Let’s check in and see what Pete has to say about this intriguing home system.

Pete, what is an RO System? 

First of all, the RO system stands for Reverse Osmosis System which is a household appliance that filters your household water so you can have purified, ready-to-drink water straight from your tap. 

How Does an RO System Work? 

It is a pressurized system that takes the water coming in and filters it through a membrane that traps all the stuff you don’t want to drink. Most of them are single units that go under your kitchen sink, but there are whole home versions as well. People want these for a number of reasons, but especially to be absolutely sure the water is safe and clean. They are helpful for people who have hard water, want a water softener, or for places where they are using well water, or rainwater, or if there are concerns about chlorine and other chemicals you don’t want to drink.

How Much is an RO System?

The single ones they call “point of use” can be bought for anywhere from $150 to $1200 and we can install them for around $300 to $500, give or take, depending on the situation. Whole-home versions generally cost from around $2000 to $12000 all in, but there are less expensive and even much more expensive types. Commercial types go up to $20,000 but what you’d need for a typical home can be at the lower end of those costs. They call those “point of entry” units since they filter the water as it enters the house so all the water is treated at every tap. The whole home systems have higher installation costs because it is a more intense process, but generally under $1000.

What are the Pros and Cons of Reverse Osmosis?

You can already tell the reason most people like them is for the peace of mind about the water their family will drink and bathe in, but people also think it tastes great and if you have hard water you can get it softened with an add on to the system and people really like that. It can save the money spent on bottled water, and of course, saves all that plastic, too, if you stop buying bottled water.

As far as cons, there is the investment mentioned above, and then you have to maintain the system. That includes things like membrane and filter replacement. They do use more water in the process, too. I have also heard that some people worry about taking too much out of the water, so they may want to add minerals back in since they get removed along with the bad stuff. 

More Questions? Give Us a Call

So those are Pete’s answers to questions about RO systems. If you have other questions or want to see if this might be something you’d like to have installed, call us at 480-388-6093 and get a quote. We are here to help!

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